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Nikki
 #1 
Hello all!!


I just received my scores from my GED test that I took in 3/1997. It shows my total score was 252. I know the scoring system changed after that and minimum score is 410. I was hoping someone might know what was the score req for 1997. I saw some old docs that said 225 but I am not sure....PLEASE HELP
Leonard
 #2 
Nikki, the score of 410 you're talking about is a minimum score on any one of the 5 tests (reading, writing, math, science, or social studies). The TOTAL score to pass these days is 2250, or an average of 450 on each of the tests.

In the old scoring system, a passing score was 225 total, an average of 45 on each test. (Sort of like they just added a zero to the scores.) The minimum score per test was I believe 40, but it might vary among states. As long as none of your scores dipped below 42, you should be fine.
Arrin
 #3 
40? do you mean 40 percent out of the 50 questions?
If its 450 to pass on that subject and it's 50 questions per subject
how many point(S) are their per question...
Leonard
 #4 
Hi, Arrin! The "40" score I was talking about is in the OLD GED scoring system. Nikki's question was about test scores from 1997, when they had a different scoring system. Basically, a 40 in the old system was kind of like a 400 in the current system, and the requirements for passing were a little different.

I know GED scoring can be difficult to understand. That's because it's not graded by percentage correct. It's graded based on a type of curve grading. Depending on what version of the test you take, the same number of correct answers could mean a different score, based on how hard or easy the questions on that test version are. To go into a little detail, you need an average score of 450 per test to pass, and a minimum score of 410 on each test. So, if you get a 410 on math and a 500 on all the other tests, you pass. But thinking of 450 as the passing score is useful... if you don't get below 450 on any test, you definitley pass.

That said, you can get a general idea of how many questions you'll need to get right. Out of 50 questions, on most tests you'll need between 30 and 38 right to score a 450, depending on the difficulty of the test. I find that a good rule of thumb is to aim for 70% correct answers. That's about 2 out of 3 questions right. If you're doing that consistently, you're in good shape!
c
 #5 

so i just got a copy of my scores from 1997 and my total was 271? Based on 225 being the minium to pass, a score of 271 is pretty low then?

Leonard
 #6 
The best way to put the GED scores into perspective is by comparing them to the percentile ranks for those scores. There's a pretty significant difference between a 225 and a 271. A 225 means an average score of 45 on each test, and that puts the test-taker in the top 70% of test-takers (for the 1988 series, the one being administered in 1997). A 271 means an average score of 54 on each test. That doesn't sound too much higher, but actually it puts you in the top 33%... that's the top third of GED test-takers. Not bad!
c
 #7 

thanks for the reply, I feel a lot better

Shae
 #8 
Hi, sorry to post such an odd question but I am not sur ewhere else to post it or find the answer. I took a GED in 1992 and I got my results and was trying to understand them and am completely lost. When I got the results then the guy told me the results were very high I got a 245 with an average of 49. Can anyone help me understand what this means because from what I am reading I had to get a lot more then that and Will I have to retake it?
Leonard
 #9 
Hi, Shae.

The scoring for the GED was much different for anyone who took the test before 2002. The scores for each test ranged from 20 to 80, instead of from 200 to 800 as they are today. The average score for a graduating high school senior was 50, so your per-test average is about right in the middle range among the sample of high school seniors... or to put it another way, you scored higher than about half the high school seniors in the test group. The minimum total to pass was 225, so you beat the minimum by a good margin. Your scores are good, solid, passing scores, and you should not need to take the test again, unless one of your subject scores is lower than 40. I'm assuming that's not the case, or else you probably would have known at the time!

Good luck,
Leonard
Erin
 #10 
Hi there. My GED test is from 1999. I took it in December, 99 and received it in January, 2000. My score also shows Total Score: of 276. Average score 55.2 I'm trying to figure out what my GPA would have been... not very easy since most of the how to's online are for the new system... I saw that they were saying "Minimum of 410" or something to pass and I was looking at my 276 going... Erm.... how'd I pass then? LOL Thankfully I found this site that explained that things have changed in 11 years.
angela
 #11 
276 is great Erin! I wonder what the highest possible score on the old scoring system? I know of someone who got a 296.
kristen
 #12 
Just saw the posts about the GED scores, and wanted to tell anyone working on it to go for it! I took mine in Nov. of 1996 and scored a 326. I had no idea what the score meant, but was determined to go back to school regardless. It took 10 years,and at times I worked part time, other times full time, and all the while raising 4 boys, ( the youngest are now 9, so I started when they were just 8 months old!) Not going to say it was easy, but it was SOOO worth it!!! I am now a social worker and plan to start on my Masters next spring. I am very proud of the fact that I graduated with honors and a 3.85 gpa, all while juggling work and kids and I think I showed them that you can do anything you want if you try hard enough. So if you are working toward it, don't let anything stop you! It's a long haul but you will sit back one day and truly be in awe of your own accomplishment! It is a lot easier to get up and go to work every day when you enjoy what you do, so make it happen. Who cares if it takes 3, 5, 7 or 10 years because you know, those years are going to pass by anyway so make what you want of them. Good Luck!
Leonard
 #13 
Kirsten, congratulations on everything you've done! Your scores were excellent, and your college performance backs that up. And thanks for sharing your story... it really helps to hear what people are doing after the GED, and it helps to have encouragement that passing and going on to college and beyond is possible!

Angela, the highest score possible on the old test was 400... but I imagine very, very few people would have got that high! To get the high score in just one subject, you have to do as well as the top 1% of high school grads... so to reach that high a score for every single test... kind of unlikely! And the scores go down pretty rapidly by getting just a few questions wrong (because the scoring is more like grading on a curve).

Erin, your scores are also great! Just as a rough estimation, you can move the decimal place over one to give a (very rough) equivalent to today's scores. That puts you in about the top 25% of graduating high school seniors. There's no real GPA conversion, but hopefully that gives you a general idea.

Leonard
Erin
 #14 
Leonard:
      I haven't been able to manage going to college yet. I want to -so- very badly but I just can't scrape up enough grants and loans to cover everything. I've gotten everything together, FAFSA, grants, loans, everything twice in the past and only one time got even close to enough money to cover my education. I had 25,000 dollars in grants and loans approved... what stopped me? 1,000 dollars that I had to pay upfront for housing. So I wasn't able to go that time either. And I've been checking again recently to see if I could manage it. I can get up to 15,000 in grants and loans but the schools I want to go to (3D Modeling & Animation)... cost 20,000 or more per year. So yet again... I just can't get enough to go to school with. So I'm living at below poverty level not because I'm not smart enough to go to school... but because I'm too broke. Pretty crappy system we've got.
Erin
 #15 
Leonard:
      I haven't been able to manage going to college yet. I want to -so- very badly but I just can't scrape up enough grants and loans to cover everything. I've gotten everything together, FAFSA, grants, loans, everything twice in the past and only one time got even close to enough money to cover my education. I had 25,000 dollars in grants and loans approved... what stopped me? 1,000 dollars that I had to pay upfront for housing. So I wasn't able to go that time either. And I've been checking again recently to see if I could manage it. I can get up to 15,000 in grants and loans but the schools I want to go to (3D Modeling & Animation)... cost 20,000 or more per year. So yet again... I just can't get enough to go to school with. So I'm living at below poverty level not because I'm not smart enough to go to school... but because I'm too broke. Pretty crappy system we've got.
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