Michael Ormsby
Here's a study suggestion:
        All the schedules in the world are not going to help if you cannot find the internal motivation to study and get the job done. Most of us are procrastinators when it comes to doing things that we do not enjoy. Here are some ideas that have helped many people.

        First, start with small pieces, donÕt take on too much. The GED involves study in five different areas and it can be overwhelming. Begin with the test area that you are most comfortable with, the one you need to work on least. DonÕt start with the hardest first, begin with the easiest. You want to experience success with your GED preparation as soon as possible. There may be many reasons why you did not finish high school, but one of the most likely was that it was not fun and rewarding for you. What you need to do now is get some success under your belt. Start your study with the test area you know best. Take a practice test and then work on the things you still need to improve upon. Take the practice test again to see if you are ready to take the actual GED. When you are, move on to another test area. (For samples of Official GED Practice Tests go to http://www.passGED.com Practice Tests.)

        Motivation is essentially based on a single premise: how bad you want something. If you really want it to happen it will. You know this to be a fact. When there was something you really, really wanted in your life, it happened didnÕt it? If you really, really want to pass the GED, you will. It is that simple. DonÕt confuse the issue with other things. Center yourself on your primary need to pass the GED and focus on that. Visualize yourself in the next step, a better job, making more money, higher education. Keep the dream in your mind and keep it fresh, it is what is going to drive you through this thing. Passing the GED is not a question of whether you can master the material, itÕs a question of whether you want to do it.

        One last comment on your motivation to study. Set some goals for your study. What do you want to accomplish and when? Maybe your strategy is to complete the GED in parts rather than attempting the whole thing in one sitting. Many people do it that way although not intentionally. They set out to pass the whole thing, but only pass one or two areas their first attempt. You do not have to retake a section once you pass it. It is done. (There are some restrictions to this if you took the test prior to 2002. See http://www.passGED.com FAQÕs for information on these rules.)

        Set time goals of when you want to pass the whole test and/or each part. As you pass the part, make sure you reward yourself. The important thing is to find what motivates you and then do it.

Deleting Attachment...